For Sun Protection

Sun rays are not good for your skin as it includes harmful UV rays. They give you wrinkles and age spots and the top cause of skin cancer. You should be protected from harmful sun rays.

  • Generously apply a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 30 or more to all exposed skin. “Broad-spectrum” provides protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. Reapply approximately every two hours, even on cloudy days, after swimming or sweating. The 7th inning stretch is a perfect time to reapply sunscreen.
  • Apply sunscreen about 20 minutes before heading outside, and reapply after bathing, sweating, or toweling off, or after every 2 hours.
  • Apply sunscreen even on cloudy day. Because 80% of sun rays reach to you on cloudy day also.
  • Seek shade when appropriate. Remember that the sun’s rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. If your shadow appears to be shorter than you are, seek shade.
  • Wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat, and sunglasses where possible.
  • Buy sunglasses with total UV protection because the eye is the second most common place for developing melanoma.
  • Choose cosmetics and contact lenses that provide sun protection.
  • Minimize sun exposure between 10am and 2pm when ultraviolet rays are the strongest.
  • Check your skin for signs of skin cancer. Checking your skin and knowing your moles are keys to detecting skin cancer in its earliest, most treatable stages. If you spot anything changing, growing or bleeding, see your dermatologist.
  • Use extra caution near water, snow and sand as they reflect and intensify the damaging rays of the sun which can increase your chance of sunburn.
  • Get vitamin D safely through a healthy diet that may include vitamin supplements. Don’t seek the sun.